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Travel to Ukraine in the time of Covid

There are good news and bad news. The bad – although 2020 did finally end, corona virus is still with us, bringing restrictions and anxiety into the new year. The good – for those who have been itching to travel, Ukraine is welcoming responsible visitors who are willing to respect the rules that aim to keep everyone safe. Here’s what you need to know if you’re traveling to Ukraine in the time of covid.  

Self-Quarantine or PCR test results required

The Ministry of Health considers the United States to be a “Red Zone” country due to its high incidence of COVID-19. Citizens of the United States are required to self-quarantine or take a COVID-19 test upon arrival at international airports in Kyiv, Kharkiv, and Lviv. The test is widely available and costs about 60 dollars (strict self-quarantine is required during the 24-48 hours you wait for the test results to be emailed to you). A third option is to take a PCR test before arriving in Ukraine, as long as it is taken within 48 hours of your arrival in Ukraine and certifies a negative result. For more details on what information is required on the document certifying the result visit the US embassy site. https://ua.usembassy.gov/covid-19-information/

Medical insurance and masks required

Upon arrival in Ukraine, US citizens must demonstrate that they have travel insurance that covers all COVID-19 related treatment while in Ukraine. This insurance can be purchased from your provider or online at https://visitukraine.today/

There will be multiple temperature screenings at the airport and masks are required in all public spaces.

No travel restrictions within Ukraine

Once you have finished the period of your quarantine or have a negative PCR test for corona virus, there are no restrictions on intercity or inter-oblast travel within Ukraine. All public transportation and commercial flights are operating. Please remember – masks that properly cover your nose and mouth are required while in all public spaces including public transportation.

Tighter restrictions from Jan. 8 – Jan 24 2021

The Ukrainian government has imposed tighter restrictions on all residents and visitors in January, in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Ukraine. From January eighth until the twenty-fourth the following changes will take place:

  • All cafes, restaurants, and bars will be open for takeaway orders and delivery, but will be unable to offer indoor service.
    • Cinemas and theaters will be closed.
    • Fitness clubs, gyms, and swimming pools will be closed.
    • Educational institutions, except for preschools and kindergartens will be closed.
    • Cultural and entertainment evens will not take place in person.
    • Sporting events can take place without spectators.
    • Shopping malls will be closed except areas that sell food, medicine, veterinary drugs, and personal hygiene products.
    • Hotels will be welcoming visitors, however all hostels will be closed.

During this period all essential services will be open. This includes grocery stores, pharmacies, banks, and postal operators.

Adaptive quarantine from Jan. 24 until Feb 28, 2021

After the stricter quarantine measures that take place in January, the government of Ukraine plans to return to its adaptive quarantine until February 28. Public events will be restricted to less than twenty people and hostels and nightclubs will remain closed. However, cafes and restaurants will resume normal operations from 7:00am until 10:00pm and will be eager to have you. All stores and some cultural events plan to reopen to visitors who pass a temperature test and wear properly fitting masks. For more Ukraine travel advice and official information visit US embassy in Ukraine https://ua.usembassy.gov/covid-19-information/

https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/ukraine
https://visitukraine.today/

Welcome to Ukraine!

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